SHIFTING GEARS

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The ocean yesterday morning. We had several insane bursts of rain later on, as if someone was playing a firehose on the house. No exaggeration!

Last month I determined to complete several projects, mostly knitting. I knit a narrow scarf, a huge shawl, a cardigan sweater for my granddaughter, and a washcloth—that last from a horrible but gorgeous cotton linen blend. I would make another washcloth if the yarn were not so stiff and rough that it hurt my hands to knit with it.

There were small writing projects I worked on and larger ones I skirted. I have ideas for two quilts and a couple of warps. Plenty of work is waiting for me. But instead of any of these, I am planning another knitting project.

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This little 4″ x 7″ swatch uses two yarns, a 2-ply Canadian merino in three colors and kid mohair/silk blends from Japan and Canada in two colors. There’s a sweater in this swatch—I just have to figure it out. In the mean time, I am writing out a pattern for my other granddaughter.

I knit a swatch and have been carrying it around for three days. Yesterday, in the coffee shop where I was meeting a friend to play Scrabble, and there was a woman knitting. I walked over and identified the yarn right down to the color: brand Malabrigo, yarn Rio, color Anniversario. Then I had to confess that no, I had not made my sweater.

That needs to change. Doesn’t it?


A PBS special about where we get our food claimed that human beings were nomadic for thousands of years until we began farming so we “didn’t have to move anymore.” The writer got that wrong. When we began farming, we could not move around anymore because we always had to be there to look after our crops. Farming did not allow us to remain in one place, it forced us to stop moving. There is evidence that this shift, rather than relieving us of a burdensome life of mobility, actually oppressed us, forcing our workdays to become longer, our labor more backbreaking. There is every possibility that this assumption that stability is preferable is mere bias. True, human beings developed architecture of stone once forced to remain in one spot, but we were already creating on a smaller scale.

Whether we traveled each day, or closed the door to a house every night, we created what scientists like to call artifacts. We call them garments, useful objects, pendants, and toys. We made art, we sang, and we told stories. These are human activities. Making stuff beautiful. This is what we do.


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My older granddaughter told me the other day that she wanted purples and pinks, and here’s the start after combining and recombining many other colors. The mohair/silk blend will likely be burgundy, and that whisper-weight thread will tip these colors darker and redder. I still need to make a swatch. If I don’t like it. I reorder my colors until I get them right.

7 thoughts on “SHIFTING GEARS

  1. Love the clouds. Love to see what you are making! Love photos of yarn and swatches.!

    On Sat, Jun 8, 2019 at 6:04 AM IMPERFECT PATIENCE wrote:

    > janpriddyoregon posted: ” Last month I determined to complete several > projects, mostly knitting. I knit a narrow scarf, a huge shawl, a cardigan > sweater for my granddaughter, and a washcloth—that last from a horrible but > gorgeous cotton linen blend. I would make another washclot” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for the eye candy. I haven’t work with colorful yarn for quite a while now. Currently I’m knitting a lap blanket for my mom and it’s all in a soft green. It’s kind to the eyes but boring for the knitter. Fortunately there’s three pattern panels that alternate and that keeps it interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The shawl I made last month was a simple pattern (which I prefer) and all of lace weight yarn. When I complained about wanting to finish the first 400 meter skein and still having another, my son said that was a quarter of a mile. No! I cried. “Sure it is. You know that—a lap around the track.” It about drove me nuts because I still had another quarter mile of one color—yikes. I want color changes running past my fingers.

      Liked by 1 person

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