BOXING DAY

It’s been a year.

And it’s not even over.

Here we are on the day we delivered gifts to Portland—our fourth trip away from home since the beginning of March. We found out later our youngest grandchild was so upset we stayed for only a minute that she cried, then cried again when she understood she could not open the gifts yet, then was appeased when she found the winged turtle, which she was meant to have.

Gary and I defied expectations and began losing weight in the last weeks. We did not gain even over Thanksgiving, but I do not dare weigh myself to find out what damage the mince hand pies might have done.

As of today, I am three kokeshi dolls and four books richer, and our son Alan and Gary gave one another the exact same bottle of whiskey.

As a studio art major, I made some excellent trades with other artists. It is the ideal and the reason many writers and other artists have my shawls. Below is Thea, a writer friend from my MFA program, who could make anything look pretty as she is so beautiful herself. The wool shawl she wears suits her and she’s not even trying.

Bill Holm died 16 December in his sleep at the age of 95. “ ‘He was a national treasure, and an international one,’ said Nuu-chah-nulth artist Joe David, and friend of Holm’s for more than 50 years. When David’s family came to cook and perform at Tillicum Village on Blake Island* during the World’s Fair in 1962, he met Holm, who was then teaching Northwest Coast art at the UW.” Gary and I took Holm’s undergraduate classes in the early 70s. Each class was offered as either Art History (me) and cultural Anthropology (Gary). We were fortunate to take them. Already he was famous all over the world. The renowned anthropologist Franz Boas had disparaged PNW Native societies, but Holm offered a clearer, unbiased perspective of the many cultures and art forms that thrived north of the Columbia river and particularly throughout British Columbia and Alaska.

“Although Holm was not a member of a tribe, Native artists acknowledged his deep expertise and his sincerity and respect for Native art and traditions. It was Holm’s passion for detail, and deep curiosity, not only in Northwest Coast art but how it was made, that set him so apart as an artist and a teacher.”—Seattle Times

“It’s so difficult to be a human being. There are so many reasons to give up. To retreat into cynicism or despair. I hate to see that and I want to do something that makes people feel safe and loved and capable.”

—Barry Lopez, who died on Christmas Day 2020

We have heard from family who are healthy, friends recovering from covid, and a former student whose parents are both ill. We hold our breath, hoping all goes well in the coming months.

*A salmon dinner on Tillicum Village on Blake Island is what Gary and I had for a honeymoon in 1974. The Burke Museum was a favorite from my early childhood and throughout my life in Seattle.

3 thoughts on “BOXING DAY

  1. Oh Barry Lopez too!

    On Sat, Dec 26, 2020 at 3:21 PM IMPERFECT PATIENCE wrote:

    > janpriddyoregon posted: ” And it’s not even over. Here we are on the day > we delivered gifts to Portland—our fourth trip away from home since the > beginning of March. We found out later our youngest grandchild was so upset > we stayed for only a minute that she cried, then cried ” >

    Like

  2. Barry Lopez lived upriver, until his home was consumed in the September wildfires. He was one of my teachers long ago, though i chose a different road, and have been returning ever since. I knew he was ill for several years yet still dismayed to learn of his death.

    “For some people, who they imagine they are does not end where the boundary of the skin meets the world. It continues with the reach of their senses out into the land.” –BL

    Liked by 1 person

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