Why We Write: On Pandemics, Heat Waves, Police Brutality, and Resiliency

Her mother's "writing represented both financial and emotional survival. For money, she edited a small newspaper and freelanced articles. For solace, she wrote stories at dawn. Some were published, and some weren’t. Publishing wasn’t the point." Melissa Hart is the author of Better with Books: 500 Diverse Books to Ignite Empathy and Encourage Self-Acceptance in Tweens … Continue reading Why We Write: On Pandemics, Heat Waves, Police Brutality, and Resiliency

How To Generate Content

This is such excellent advice I decided to figure out how to “reblog.” (HINT: Allison K. Williams’ Brevity posts are always worthwhile.) Perhaps I will even try to take this good advice. I keep thinking this might be the time to share my best writing prompts, especially since Willamette Writers has postponed events (well, of course they have) so I don’t know when my presentation will take place.

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

“Start a blog!” agents say. “Write a newsletter!” announce publishers. “You’ll build readership and be more attractive to agents and publishers!”

But what the heck do you put in it? Hey, I got rejected again by the same magazine?

Yes.

Absolutely.

(I do.)

The daily grind of your writing life is indeed fodder for bulletins every week or two. More than once a week gets annoying; less than once a month and people forget who you are and unsubscribe. Try to share your work the same time and day, so that people have a subconscious expectation of reading you, say, Tuesday mornings.

I have to write something every week? What if it’s not good? What if it’s not a diamond-sharp, multiply-revised presentation of my Best Thoughts Ever?

And a blog post or email newsletter is not a lengthy, many-drafted essay. In fact, the best content is:

Brief,

Personal, and

Useful

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